Recreation

Come October 2018, Canadians and tourists will finally be able to take part in legal recreational cannabis sales. However, we’ll all have to wait a while to access some of our favorite products, like beverages and edibles, and extracts meant for vaping. This is the government's response to what they call ‘unique risks’ to the regulation of these infused or extracted cannabis treats. Among these risks are concerns about how to package them and suggested dosages.

Unfortunately, the time it will take between recreational cannabis going live and the introduction of these crucial products may allow the black market to regain traction. If the goal of legalization is to snuff out the black market, it seems the lapse in legalizing extracts, edibles, and beverages may cause some issues.

Despite pleas to allow these products in the upcoming legalization of the recreational market, the government is steadfast in their plan to release more complicated cannabis products incrementally, starting in 2019. Product classifications are imperative to capturing a new market in this fledgling industry. Many of the companies heavily invested in Canadian cannabis have large manufacturing facilities already in operation to develop, test, and eventually market all sorts of infused products. Canadians who desire the excluded products will be left with two choices—either be patient and wait to purchase legally or look to the black market to supply their needs.

  Posted: Monday, August 27th, 10:09pm a month ago
Profile PictureWritten By: Cara Wietstock

Cara Wietstock is a native Californian living in Washington state with almost a decade of budtender experience and even more stoner experience. While she's not pontificating on the current state of cannabis for Roottie, she is practicing yoga, sipping CBD infused teas and hiking through the Pacific Northwest.

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